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a7xfanben
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 5:33 pm Reply with quote

Very cool games, captain_vendari! I really enjoyed the pictures you took.

I need to get my hands on some of those SS islands; they're big-time game-changers!

By the way, I went on your fansite a while back, but now when I try to go there, it says the webpage is not available. Anyone else having this issue?
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 6:18 pm Reply with quote

a7xfanben wrote:
By the way, I went on your fansite a while back, but now when I try to go there, it says the webpage is not available. Anyone else having this issue?


That's really weird; I was on it a few days ago looking up keywords. But now I've tried to access it as well. I think the host I'm using isn't supporting the version of the site editor mine was on. I'm going to try switching to the current on and see if that does anything.

EDIT: Okay, try it now. I had to switch some things around, but I think this looks good.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 1:13 am Reply with quote

It works now, thanks! Smile

Ironically, I can't go on the Corsairs of Douglas County website either.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 3:06 am Reply with quote

a7xfanben wrote:
It works now, thanks! Smile

Ironically, I can't go on the Corsairs of Douglas County website either.


That I can't help you with.

By the way, let me know how I did with the nations section? I could really use some feedback there.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2014 12:44 am Reply with quote

captain_vendari wrote:
By the way, let me know how I did with the nations section? I could really use some feedback there.


I thought it looked pretty good. Sometimes you make it sound like factions are only good at one thing (like combat vs. gold-running). For example, France is one of the best nations for gold, even if you only consider the Bon Marin, Pique, and L'Artesien. Also, there are some Corsair ships that can hold their own in a fight. Basically, the big 4 (England, France, Spain, Pirates) are all capable of fielding very effective and balanced fleets, with the other two of the big 6 (Americans and Cursed) a little bit behind them.

You say that the Mercenaries play "just like the Cursed", but I would say they're worse because they can't even dock at their own home island.

The descriptions for other nations looked good.

You could download the Windlass font and play around with it if you wanted to.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 11:10 pm Reply with quote

Hey everybody, finally was able to play again after an eight month hiatus. It's been too long. Unfortunately I probably won't be able to play again for a while, but the game I did play was memorable and fun!

After rereading woelf's review of El Garante, I was inspired to use her, with none other than the Spanish Native Canoes to provide cheerleaders to complement the Garante's ability. To round out the Spanish fleet, I went with the Rafael, a four masted schooner from DJC that I hadn't used before, and HMS Trepassey, which is an English ship that I threw in since I hadn't used her either, being one of the newer additions to my fleet.

The above fleet went against a Pirate fleet with 3 new ships (I had to punch them and everything!) and El Tejon, a superb support gunship with the sniping ability (double the range of this ship's cannons, hit only on a 6). The other ships were the Black Pearl (the uncommon version), the Freedom's Hand (another two masted sniper ship), and the Adventure, a three masted schooner from CC with 5 cargo that would serve as the fleet's main treasure runner.

The fleets were 60 points, and a standard setup with 6 islands, 6 terrain, and 16 coins worth 30 gold was distributed. With a tip from CC Mike, I've found that games are usually more fun when the islands are 2L apart from each other (like in the old days), rather than 3L. This was the case for this game as well. It also helps the game go a little bit faster, which can help if you have limited time in which to play.

The full fleets were as follows:
Spanish
El Garante + Tribal Chieftain, captain, helmsman, firepot specialist
Native Canoes
El Rafael + helmsman, explorer
HMS Trepassey



Pirates
Black Pearl + captain, helmsman, fire shot
El Tejon + captain, helmsman
Freedom's Hand + captain, helmsman
Adventure + helmsman, explorer



The Spanish were the first player, and the Pirates picked a home island for them in the east. The Spanish went first after picking a western island to be the Pirates' HI. The native canoes were placed by the Spanish on an island just to the southwest of the Spanish HI.

On the first turn, the Trepassey sailed southeast at L+S+S since her cargo hold was empty, reaching the first island. There she found 5 total gold. The canoes emptied their island, leaving one canoe empty. The Garante set off in the direction of the native canoes, in the hopes that they could unite to make the Garante's guns more accurate.

For the Pirates, the Adventure sailed northeast to the nearest wild island, escorted for the moment by the Black Pearl. Due to their sniping abilities and the close distances between islands, the Tejon and Freedom's Hand were able to get their extra-long range guns in range of the Spanish. With one gun in range, the Tejon rolled a 5 (she needed a 6) and missed the Garante. The Freedom's Hand moved more to the south and sniped a canoe that had loaded a coin from the island, giving the Pirates the gold lead (it was a 1) on the first hit of the game! Her second shot missed, but the Pirates were up 1-0 and the Spanish lost a canoe.

On the next turn, the Trepassey headed back to the Spanish HI, while the Rafael made it to the island she was sailing to in the north. Upon exploring, her crew found just 4 1's, of which she had room for 3.

In the south, the Garante was looking to avenge the sinking of one of "her" canoes, sailing into range of the Freedom's Hand. However, there was only one other canoe within S of the Garante when she shot at the Hand, but it helped. The Garante hit 2 times out of 4, dismasting the Hand and ending the threat to the other native canoes. The canoe that was closest to the Garante was the only one without gold, so the other three headed northeast to return to the Spanish HI.



The Freedom's Hand is a galley, and with a helmsman she was able to move S+S away from the Garante, looking to head home and repair. In the meantime, the Adventure loaded 3 coins from a wild island.

At this moment, the Pirates faced the first dilemma of many that they would encounter in this game. Between the speed of the Black Pearl (L+S+S) and the range of El Tejon's cannons (2L, or L+L), this Pirate fleet has considerable long range firepower and striking capabilities (plus all four of the Pearl's guns are long range). However, the speed (L+S) of the Tejon meant that it would be very difficult to get both of her regular guns in range. They measured multiple times, but they determined that they had two options. The Tejon had only one canoe in range of her regular (non-doubled range) cannons, but with the extended range she had 2 canoes in range.

At this point I consulted the Pirate Code to find out if you can double the range of only ONE (or maybe 2 out of 5 if it was a bigger ship like the Neptuno) of the ship's cannons, and roll regularly on the other one. The Pirate Code didn't say, so I'm asking in the Rules Thread. However, the ability text reads: "You may double the range of this ship’s cannonS each turn, but you must roll a 6 to hit." Since it says "cannons", I ruled that it can't shoot one cannon at L and the other cannon at L+L on the same turn. Therefore the Pirates were faced with a choice of shooting once at 2L or twice at 5L. They decided to risk shooting twice and rolled a 4 on the first shot. However, the second shot was a 6! As it happened, the shot that hit was on the canoe that was already within L range. Rolling Eyes In the end, a second native canoe was sent to the bottom, but she had a 2 on her. The sunken treasure was split 50/50, giving the Pirates 2 gold to the Spaniards' 1.

Edit: woelf ruled that you actually CAN double the range of only one of the ship's cannons.

The Black Pearl sailed behind the docked Rafael and promptly shot away all four of her masts in a perfect 4/4 shoot action!



On the next turn, the Trepassey docked home 5 gold, giving the Spanish 6 overall. Next to dock were the two remaining canoes that held gold. Fortunately for the Spanish, these were the two canoes that had the highest value coins of the four original canoes, a 4 and a 3. However, the +1 gold bonus from the ability of the canoes brought the total value of the gold to 9 (4+3+1+1), which left the Spanish at 15 overall, only 1 gold away from winning!

Now it was time for the Garante to move. When she sailed south to attack the Freedom's Hand on the previous turn, this allowed the Tejon to sink one of the canoes. The Garante still had to turn around and sail northeast to get at the Tejon, which would have taken two turns (there was also a Sargasso Sea in the area to complicate things). In the end, she sailed northwest to pursue the fleeing Freedom's Hand, and easily sunk her. The canoe without gold continued to follow the Garante to give her +1 to cannon rolls.

With 15 gold, the Spanish could taste victory. Knowing how powerful the Black Pearl and the Tejon were, they looked to the fastest way to win: sinking the Rafael. If the Rafael and the three gold (all 1's) on her went under, the Spanish would win either way. If the Pirates sank her, they would receive 2 gold and the Spanish would receive 1 gold, giving them 16 gold and the win. If the Spanish could scuttle the Rafael, the 3 gold would be removed from the game, which would only leave 14 gold left in play for the Pirates (30 gold - 13 actual gold on Spanish HI since 2 are "tallies" = 17 - 3 gold from Rafael = 14 gold < 15). The Pirates needed the gold from the Rafael and all but one gold from what was left on the islands in order to win the game.

The Spanish rolled a successful 5 on the scuttle attempt, but the Black Pearl captured the Rafael on the Pirates' turn, making her a member of the Pirate fleet. The Adventure headed home with gold.

The Tejon had turned around and now went after the Garante, since the canoes had already docked home their gold. The Tejon just barely managed to get both of her guns within L+L range, and hit with one of them, taking out one mast on the Garante.



The Spanish took their turn and sent their remaining treasure runners (the Trepassey and the two canoes docked at their HI) to the southeast island that the Trepassey had already explored, since they knew that the one gold on the island would win them the game if they could get it home. The Spanish sent all three in order to have strength in numbers, hoping that the Trepassey could get the coin home while the canoes ran interference.

In the meantime, the big bad Garante decided she'd had enough of the Tejon's sniping actions, sailing around the Sargasso and sinking the Tejon with help from the canoe that was still following her. In fact, 2 out of the 3 hits were 3's, which would have missed if not for the +1 provided by the canoe being within S of the Garante! With that, the Pirates had both of their snipers sunk, leaving them with the Adventure and the Black Pearl.

The Adventure docked home 8 gold, bringing the Pirates to 10 gold total. The Spanish still led 15-10. Since towing the derelict Rafael would slow the Black Pearl down (although not very much, since I believe the Pearl would still be able to go S+S+S with her ability and helmsman), the Pearl decided to drop her and speed after the three Spanish treasure runners to the south.



The one masters head south as the Black Pearl looms:


As planned, the Trepassey grabbed the 1 gold from the southeast island, while the canoes tried to stand between her and the oncoming Black Pearl. The canoes are tiny, and had no time to orient themselves properly before the lightning fast gunship was upon them. The Pearl managed to get in range of one canoe, sinking it, but was out of range of the other one and the Trepassey.

The Garante sailed east towards the action, with her trusty canoe following right behind. The Adventure set out to the east as well, knowing she was probably too slow and too late to help the Black Pearl.

The game was coming to a thrilling conclusion! The Trepassey was desperate to avoid the Black Pearl, sailing around a reef in the south and trying to get home. The Garante headed northeast around a different reef to sink the Rafael, who was now a Pirate ship but also a sitting duck.

Here was another Pirate dilemma: the Black Pearl had to either sink the Trepassey, who had the winning gold aboard, or attack the Garante, who was about to sink the Rafael and therefore force the end of the game. Their decision was made easier due to the fact that the Trepassey had just gotten within L+S of the Spanish HI (L+S is her base move when carrying treasure), so the Black Pearl had no choice but to sink the Trepassey. In addition, the Black Pearl would have needed to hit all four times to guarantee (no pun intended) that the Garante would be dismasted and therefore not able to sink the Rafael.

The Black Pearl sank the Trepassey, giving the Pirates the 1 gold on her (Spanish lead 15-11). It was inconsequential, but the Adventure picked up the 2 that was still lying on her island from earlier in the game.

On the next turn, the Garante sailed into range of the Rafael and tried to sink her to end the game! Although the Spanish had been ahead in the gold race for a while at this point, the Pirates had many opportunities for false hope, even to the very end. The Garante missed on her first three shots, and only on the final shot did she roll a 3, sinking the former Spanish ship to give the Spanish a 17-12 victory! (the Spanish got 2 of the 3 gold on the Rafael, with the Pirates getting the other 1) If that native canoe wasn't still following the Garante around, the Pirates would have had another shot! So although the strategy of using the native canoes to support the Garante didn't work as well as planned, with only one canoe providing any cannon bonus, that one canoe made all the difference!



Towards the end of the game the Pirates realized that they could have kept towing the Rafael. The Black Pearl had a captain and helmsman aboard, so even with the Rafael in tow she would have sailed at S+S+S, probably fast enough to sink the Trepassey anyway. In this way, however, the Rafael would have been mobile and farther away from the Garante than she was in the actual game, not to mention that the Garante would have to deal with the Black Pearl if she had wanted to go after the Rafael. It's likely the Spanish would have won even if the Pearl had towed the Rafael around after she had captured her, but it is interesting to think about nonetheless. Cool


Last edited by a7xfanben on Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:15 am; edited 1 time in total
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Subject:    PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 12:30 am Reply with quote

I haven't played a game yet, but I wanted to document an old game to the best of my ability. Plus, I don't want this thread to get locked up. Very Happy

I started the Pojo version of this thread on July 24th, 2011, about a month after I joined MT and Pojo. I was getting back into the game for the first time in multiple years, and started playing again.

I don't know exactly how many games I played between mid-June of 2011 and July 24th, but I don't think it was very many. There were three reasons:
1. I was spending a bunch of time on MT and Pojo getting to know the sites.
2. I believe I did a Historical Fantasy Scenario (HFS), which is basically using the ships to wage huge naval wars without using the actual rules of the game.
3. I played a MASSIVE game that was never fully written about.

#3 has always been a very interesting topic when I occasionally think about it, which isn't very often. Since I started the Battle Reports thread on Pojo after the game ended, a lot of the finer details have been forgotten. However, here I will write what I remember. This particular game holds a special place in my personal Pirates CSG "lore" if you will - all of my older games are documented, so I can go back and remember what happened. This one is a murky subject that is a legendary game in my book, sort of akin to the SiaB discussions and old eBay posts, among other famous posts here at MT. I have found some limited documentation of the game in the first thread I ever started at Pojo.

Back in those days, when I did HFS's, I used an entire room of floor space, although the particular room isn't huge, and of course has many things on the floor to inhibit space (but also provide natural obstructions Smile ). Because of the huge sea, ships took longer to reach their destinations.

Each faction had a harbour. The English were in the far east, the Spanish in the south, the Pirates in the north, the French in the northwest, and an alliance of the Americans, Cursed, Barbary Corsairs, and Mercenaries in the southwest. The harbours were made out of dozens of duplicate ship deckplates, with "unlaunched" ships sitting on the deckplates waiting to be bought, whereas launched ships would dock in different places in the harbour. I used to punch out all of my duplicates because I used them for HFS's and because I hadn't started trading here yet.

Edit (7/22/2015): I've made a harbour example, detailed in this thread. Here's what a typical harbour would look like:


The game was a cumulative one, where points are spent as the game goes along to build up your fleet. However, there was a distinguishing factor that set this game apart from all others that I've played: the treasure distribution.

Normally for a cumulative game, each island starts out with maybe 3 or 4 treasure coins each, and treasure magically replenishes itself at the end of each turn until the original max is reached. However, when I did HFS's, I would simply stack as much treasure on the islands as possible. When I say stack, I mean STACK. Each stack of coins would be at least 10 coins high (usually more I think), and there would be a minimum of (probably) around 6 or more stacks per island. This was the case for EVERY island, not just some "Paradise Island" in the middle. (You can see where this is going Shocked )

Since I was so used to placing treasure like this, I did the same for the cumulative game. I can't remember if I ever had the treasure replenish itself as well, but either way there was basically so much gold on every island that you could barely see the island itself, not to mention that the stacks were taller than some of the ships. Laughing

Edit (11/27/2015): Here's an example of what an average wild island would look like for this game:


Also, I used custom rules with the introduction of infantry and artillery units from RISK, but they didn't play a big factor in the game.

EDIT: I wrote all of this before I found the old thread on Pojo, which I'll quote from occasionally to supplement the report I wrote today.

06-20-2011
a7xfanben wrote:
I am starting a long game where each player starts with 20 points for ships/crew. I placed 20 islands in my room, 14 of them mysterious. I placed all of my unique treasure, and I am going to experiment using the infantry and artillery units from Risk (I don't have any forts, sadly). Here are my rules for them (still in the early stages):

Infantrymen units (cost two points): They can be stationed at home harbour (or home island, I use harbours so I can fit all the ships) or on island. A player with an infantry or artillery unit on an island is occupying the island. The infantrymen are eligible for invasions/shoot actions. Invasions: An invasion counts as a general action. Therefore, a ship cannot dock at an island and invade that same turn unless her ability lets her dock and explore in the same move action.

The infantry units act as returning fire, not as an actual cannon. When an enemy ship fires on them, and misses twice in a row, one mast from the enemy ship is eliminated. Boarding parties: When an enemy attempts to invade, they roll on a boarding party as normal. For the designated infantry unit, roll a d6 and add one. If the ship has the higher result, the infantry unit is eliminated and the controller of the ship is allowed to place one of their own infantry units from that ship on the island. Each infantry unit represents one short-range three-rank cannon, for land combat (these cannons can only shoot at other infantry/artillery units). An infantry unit is not allowed a land shoot action the turn it is landed successfully. Infantry units take up one cargo space.

Artillery units (six points): Can be used in invasions, and can be stationed on island or at harbour. On land, they are a long-range two-rank cannon and require two hits from the same infantry shoot action to be eliminated. They can shoot at enemy ships as a regular shoot action, and are mobile (you can position them at any place on the island for optimum range), but cannot be given any extra actions. Artillery units take up two cargo spaces.


This game was bizarre in many ways: unspeakable amounts of gold, huge distances between harbours that hindered battling, and weird rulings that came up as part of my house-rulings and somewhat limited collection.

06-21-2011
a7xfanben wrote:
I am making progress on my big game today. The French and alliance of American/Mercenary/Cursed/Corsair have had terrible luck with island placement and mysterious islands. The Spanish were the first to purchase infantry and artillery units for the defense of their harbour. It has been all gold collecting so far, but now the Pirates are gunning to take down what looks to be the fastest-starting faction, the Spanish (mainly because of the Joya del Sol with a helmsman). The Pirates are sending the Revenant and some supporting ships (Muerta de la Corona for +1 to cannon rolls against Spanish ships, and Freedom for gold stealing) to wreak havoc. I am playing as the English, and my harbour is somewhat isolated, at one end of the room, but I have been able to buy some good ships for this gold-running start (HMS Hyena is 9 pts. for S+S and five cargo spaces, HMS King Edward has six cargo spaces).


The Pirates began a small fight against the Spanish in the middle of the ocean between their two harbours, but the first action didn't last long at all. However, it made the Pirates hate the Spanish, which would become more important later on.

I remember the English having to travel the furthest distance to get to their wild island(s), and so they wanted to expand to some more. The Spanish were the closest harbour, and so the English picked on them. (the Pirates were to the north, but their harbour lay around the corner of a cape, so they were harder to get to.) Some English ships including HMS Leicester began attacking the Spanish, inflicting heavy losses on both sides. The attack was eventually repulsed because it was so close to the Spanish harbour, so the Spanish had a much easier time getting reinforcements to the front lines.



Probably the most memorable part of this game was the system of chain exploring set up by the Spanish. The following is a quote from the Rules Thread.

a7xfanben wrote:
Warning: This is extremely specific and impractical. It only would only be feasible in huge games, and games where the islands have more treasure on them than normal (a non-standard game with stacks of treasure on islands, or treasure that replenishes each turn). Line up a bunch of empty ships touching at the bow and stern, with the lead ship in the line docked at a wild island. The final ship is docked at your home island. Ideally the island is as close to home as possible. Also, it would help if all of the ships had the same cargo hold. The lead ship explores the island, and each ship on down the line explores the ship in front of her, taking the treasure all the way to the last ship, where it is automatically unloaded.

This is too wacky to even try in 99.9% of games, but in this way you could have a supply line of ships that automatically transports treasure from an island to your home island.


Due to the fact that cumulative games don't have a point limit, this particular game lent itself well to exploiting this idea. The Spanish had a perfect storm going: there were huge stacks of treasure on the wild islands, one of these islands was close to their harbour, and they had bought a lot of ships (the only ones I know for sure were two copies of the Cazador del Pirata) with around 3 masts and at least 3 cargo hold.

With the nearby island to the north of their harbour, the Spanish set up the system. One ship docked at the island, and then another ship lashed herself to the stern of the first ship, with the last ship being docked at the Spanish harbour. The line was at least 5 ships long, maybe 7 or 8. There may have actually been TWO lines Shocked , but I don't know for sure. In addition, they still had a handful of ships sailing to and from the island as normal and bringing back gold. I would estimate that the whole operation consisted of at least 20 ships, all at this one island. (I think they almost were able to set up a second line of ships to another island, but they got attacked before it could be completed.)

Naturally the Spanish were getting rich very fast, milking one island for probably an average of at least 5 coins per turn overall. They launched more ships, both goldships and gunships, making their fleet even more impressive. This is not to say that all of the other factions struggled, for they were generally successful in running gold in a normal fashion. The Spanish were the only ones to set up the chain-exploring system, which hasn't been seen since.



The other extremely memorable part of this game concerned a single game piece. It wasn't a ship or even a named crew, but a UT: the Cursed Conch. The Cursed Conch lets you sacrifice one of your ships to move an opponent's sea monster. However, my collection at the time didn't contain a single sea monster, and so I house-ruled the ability to say "ship" in place of sea monster. I didn't think much of it at the time, but soon it became apparent just how dangerous this UT had become.

Which faction discovered the once-legendary Cursed Conch? Naturally, the Spanish. Rolling Eyes Laughing

I'm not sure whether it was discovered on the island they had built a chain to, but it was discovered relatively early on in the game, and therefore had a huge impact.

Now, for a word about the harbour system: the harbours function much differently than home islands. They serve the same purpose, but each harbour was much bigger (probably about 2 feet wide by 2 feet long), with docks coming out from the wall of the room. Each harbour had designated places where ships were launched (on the outside where they could immediately start sailing), and ships were repaired (inside the harbour). The large number of docks and passages lent well to "hiding" ships if a faction wanted to do so.

After the Spanish discovered the Cursed Conch, I think they put it on a 4 master, and began "saccing" her each turn to cause havoc and chaos in other fleets. The Conch was later transferred to either a 1 or 2 master, because the Spanish wanted to use the bigger ship since it was more valuable.

Since the Pirates were the closest harbour (to the north), they were messed with the most. This further angered the Pirates, who had already lost a short skirmish against the Spanish earlier in the game. The Americans were also a target of the Conch, and they were the first to attempt to retaliate.

After the Conch was transferred to one of the smallest Spanish ships, the Spanish docked her deep within the bowels of their harbour, so she could "hide" and be "safe" from enemies looking to sink her or steal the Conch. However, the Spanish harbour was consisted mostly of docks facing due north, and they didn't have a place to hide their ship in the recessed southeast corner of their harbour. Therefore they docked her almost all the way to the back against the wall in one of the inner docks on the west side. This became important later on.

Edit (7/22/2015): Here's another mockup picture showing a harbour example with the Honu Iki at the top of the picture approximately how far back the Spanish sloop was:


Again, pretend it's a Spanish ship, but this is basically what the Pirates and the Cursed Blade were after:


The Americans quickly grew weary of their ships being moved about by the Spanish, and sent some ships (the Enterprise was one of them) east to attack. Their goal was to sink or steal the Conch, but their efforts were too scattered. The Spanish either held on to it or stole it back, and the losses the Americans suffered as a result of these disorganized attacks dealt them losses that were hard to overcome. Additionally, I didn't have as many good gold ships for the Americans, Cursed, and Barbary Corsairs as I do today, so the Americans weren't likely to win the game anyway.

06-23-2011
a7xfanben wrote:
In my game today, the Revenant was quickly repelled from her attack on the Spanish harbour when two of her masts were knocked out from the harbour's artillery batteries.

The infantry haven't played a role yet, but then again there have not been any real battles (the Revenant action was the first and it was brief-she didn't have enough backup). The Spanish have had luck with the mysterious islands-the one closest to them lets you take two treasure from every other wild island in the game and put it on this one before you explore, if you roll a five or six.

On the other hand, the French have had their Petit Dauphin sunk, Danae dismasted, and Courageaux damaged at a single island (Roll 5d6. For every 4-6 result, eliminate one of this ship's masts). The Spanish are calmly and steadily accumulating more gold, while the nearby pirates are scrambling to put a good fleet together to wipe them out (or die trying).

I am using all of my unique treasure, including the Cursed Conch, but I don't have any sea monsters (normally it lets you give a sea monster an action instead of the ships it is on), so I changed the ability to let the controller move any ship in play. This has had an undesirably overpowered effect. The Cursed Blade has been thwarted from stealing it by being sent back to where she came from, and the Enterprise was moved onto a reef, losing two masts.

Tomorrow the Pirates will attack and we will see which fleet is stronger. As the English, I sent a squadron to steal unique treasure from the other factions, the French and American/Mercenary. Then I finally bought the Leicester for 18 and decked her out with Admiral Morgan (5-6:extra action), Ducie Chads (5-6 same action twice, +1 against Pirates) and the Gentleman (captain ability and die re-roll for the above effects).


With one attack repulsed (pun intended; I think I actually used La Repulsa in this game), the Spanish went about their business of chain-exploring. However, they realized what a threat the Conch was to other factions' security, and so transferred it to a smaller ship that they hid in the back of their harbour. It wasn't long before it was the center of attention once again.

With the Americans weakened and the French and English having slow gold fleets, the Pirates had in the meantime built a fleet that was surpassed in size only by the Spanish. As a result, the Spanish began using the Conch exclusively against the Pirates, which led them to the conclusion that they must attack the Spanish or face elimination. A battle fleet was gradually launched and assembled, and they began clustering in the ocean to an area to the northwest of the Spanish harbour, but still out of striking distance.

More than anything, the Pirates wanted the Conch. They wanted to steal it and use it against the Spanish. For this they launched the Cursed Blade, one of my favourite ships and the perfect ship for the job. They also considered the Raven because of her speed, but they didn't want to risk losing a boarding party. With the strategy they were planning, they would have just one shot at the Conch.

The Pirates knew that the small Spanish ship had the Conch and no other treasures. The Cursed Blade didn't need to win a boarding party to steal the Conch, but only to make contact with the Spanish ship. The Blade was crewed with a helmsman to boost her speed to S+S+S, and Calico Cat to give her an extra action to move twice for a total of 6S. She probably had other crew aboard such as a captain and/or oarsman, but I don't remember if I had a Pirate reroller back then.

The Cursed Blade positioned herself at the southeast edge of the cluster of Pirate ships accumulating in anticipation of the upcoming battle. The Blade would go in first in an attempt to take the Conch. She had to wait a few turns for the SAT from Calico Cat, turns that were spent in anxious anticipation. There was also a lot of time spent measuring distances and ranges, for the Pirates knew they had one shot at it. They would end their move deep in the Spanish harbour with ships sailing to block the entrance off before she could escape.

The Cursed Blade finally got the SAT, and she zoomed in 6S straight into the Spanish harbour, crashing into the small Spanish ship. I believe the ram took out a mast, and it may have been a 1 master, which would mean she was totally dismasted. Either way, the Blade was successful in grabbing the Conch. The problem was, she couldn't use it or transfer it to safety until she made it out of the harbour. I don't think she did. Question

This is where my memory fails me. All I remember is that all hell broke loose. The Spanish panicked, the chain broke, and the Pirates attacked! I can honestly say that the Cursed Blade's action that turn altered the game forever, in a single, solitary moment of brilliance that caused a chain reaction that would be felt for the rest of the game.

I want to say that neither the Cursed Blade nor her crew got out of the harbour alive. If they made it out, I think they were sunk soon thereafter. The entire cluster of Pirate ships (probably 2/3 of their overall fleet) sailed down upon the Spanish, and the battle was on! Due to the Spanish being backed up against their own harbour, the battle was extremely close-fought, and I remember a lot of ramming and boarding. The chain broke because the Spanish wanted more of their numbers in the main battle area, which quickly spread a little bit towards the east, where the chain was originally docked. The battle was very chaotic, because the Pirates were in a manic rage to kill as many Spaniards as possible, and the Spanish didn't expect such a large battle.

The other factions took notice of this epic clash between the two largest navies. The English joined the main battle, but they did so from the east, near where the chain had been. This meant that the Spanish were fighting two foes at once, since most of the Pirate ships were more to the west and south. In the end, the Spanish were generally eliminated through all the carnage, and the Pirates eventually retreated back to their harbour to repair their considerable losses. However, the English had arrived late to the battle, and still had fresh ships sailing up as the battle was ending. Therefore, they kept on sailing west through the area where the battle had been.

In the meantime, the Americans somehow managed to get the Cursed Conch during all of the chaos:

06-25-2011
a7xfanben wrote:
The Pirates are almost finished wiping out the Spanish, and the English eventually got involved also. The Americans/Mercenaries managed to get the Cursed Conch with the Santa Molina (with help from the Enterprise), but now they are under attack from the French.

Many ships were sunk today (the highlights being the Leicester, Revenant, Harbinger, and Acorazado), and now the fleets are trying to salvage what they can after the long melee and distribute shipwrights (because their home harbours are too far away, and they don't have treasure to repair, I usually require a ship to pay two treasure points to repair at her home island if she doesn't have a shipwright there, this is what I have done for years with my fantasy scenarios).

The French were exposed to the battle the least and have the most fresh ships. I am looking forward to the final conclusion of what looks like a week-long game, which will probably happen near the American/Mercenary harbour (where they headed after they got the conch).


The French (with their harbour based in the northwest) had started to sail southeast towards the main battle as well, but they didn't get there in time. However, they arrived in the middle of the ocean just as the English were sailing west, and another battle became imminent!

The English and French didn't have fleets nearly as large as the Pirates and Spanish, so the battle was shorter and less grand overall. I'm not sure who won, but both fleets were battered and weak by the end of it.

At this point, the Pirates had done a bunch of repairs and were ready to have another battle. They weren't at the full strength they had been at before the Spanish battle, but they were plenty large enough to defeat any of the remaining fleets. They spotted the winner of the English/French battle and promptly sailed southwest to clean up the scraps. It was relatively easy for them to win, and for reasons I don't remember the Americans had been eliminated as well (possibly as part of the English/French battle). The Pirates were the last fleet sailing, and therefore were the winners of this long cumulative game! Very Happy

That's the best I can remember. It was one of the most memorable games I've ever played, and now that I'm done writing this it's much longer than I expected it to be. Surprised

06-26-2011, 06-27-2011
a7xfanben wrote:
I am finishing up an unlimited point game where the fleets accumulate ships/crew as you go along, and it has taken about a week. At one point I had well over 100 ships in play at once...

The Pirates ended up winning, as the English and the French got tied up in a decent fleet action, which allowed the Pirates plenty of time to repair, regroup, and bring back some of their sunken ships.


Last edited by a7xfanben on Sat Jul 29, 2017 4:57 pm; edited 3 times in total
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Subject: 30 point game between the French and the Pirates   PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:28 am Reply with quote

I was able to play a game just now! This was the first game since late September, but it doesn't feel like it's been two months, probably since the previous hiatus was so much longer.

For this particular game I decided to use Cadet-Captain Mike's random setup tables. I rolled a 1 (30 point fleets), a 4 (no limits), and a 3 (no crew limits or bonuses). Basically a simple 30 point game (like back in the SM days Cool ) with no restrictions.

French:
La Bonne Chance + captain
La Fureur + helmsman
St. Joan
Marianne



Pirates:
Flying Dutchman + captain, helmsman
Black Heart + explorer



You can see that the French were going for a setup favoring multiple smaller ships while the Pirates set sail with two large ships. The low point limit lent itself well to using the Bonne Chance and the Flying Dutchman, two of the cheaper gunships in the game.

It had to be a quick game, so no terrain and UT's were used. However, for the first time I was conscious of implementing woelf's house rules, which I have been interested in for a few months now.

woelf wrote:
1) The build total is randomly determined by rolling 2d6, a d12, or a d20 and multiplying by 10. (We used the d12 this time.)
2) Fleets are built "on the spot", so we know prior to building which nations are being used. We also make it known if including any "specialty" ships that require unique counters (specifically, submersibles) in a fleet, so the other players can adjust accordingly. (This minimizes unfair advantages and helps avoid wasting points on contingencies that would be useless without their specific targets.)
3) Treasure (including UTs) is completely randomized after building fleets. We make it a point to mix a variety of different colors - light gold, dark gold, silver, and even transparent.
4) Events and Forts are generally not used. (They aren't explicitly forbidden, but we just never bother with them.)
5) We play until only one player has ships remaining or there is no treasure left to be unloaded at home islands.


For this game all but number 1 was used, because of the random setup table. For the future, there probably won't be much variety in terms of gold because the extra-light pieces are few and far between in my collection and therefore it's easy to see which island has a particular treasure value. I hope to use silver explorers in fleets more often. I don't have any transparent gold. Events aren't too popular (if you couldn't already tell Rolling Eyes ) unless I'm purposely testing out fleets that are supposed to win every game - Norvegia, Hai Peng combos, etc, etc. On the other hand, I very much enjoy using forts, although sadly they don't see much action in small and fast games.

The Pirates were the first player, and the French picked a home island for them to the east. The Pirates picked the middle island to be the French HI. In addition, although the ships weren't from the Spanish Main set, I wanted it to be close to an "original" game, so the islands were placed 2L apart. In general, the closer the islands are to each other the better. Also, now that I think about it, there was no terrain in SM, so it's actually good that there wasn't terrain in this setup.

The Pirates went first, and the Black Heart headed to an island. The Flying Dutchman followed on her starboard side in order to potentially block the nearby Bonne Chance. The French split up, with each of the three small ships heading to a different wild island. The Bonne Chance circled around her HI, keeping an eye on the Flying Dutchman.



On the next turn, all four ships designed to carry gold docked at their islands. However, only the Pirates could load gold since the Black Heart was the only ship with an explorer. This left the St. Joan a potential sitting duck for the nearby Dutchman.



On the next turn, the Dutchman sailed towards the docked St. Joan, who would explore later that same turn. The Dutchman's speed of L+S and S-range cannons weren't enough to reach the St. Joan, but the Pirates sailed straight for her anyway because they needed to make a move before it was too late and the French runners got home. Also, the Bonne Chance has only three masts against the Dutchman's five, so the Pirates were willing to take a hit or two if they could cripple at least one French runner.

The Marianne and Fureur loaded gold as the Black Heart sailed home with all four coins from the southeast island. However, the Bonne Chance moved to counter the Dutchman just as the Pirates expected, taking out one mast in a rather unsuccessful shoot action.



The Dutchman was only partially blocked and was able to maneuver around the Bonne Chance and get her remaining four guns in range of the St. Joan. The Pirates were thinking their gamble had paid off, until the Dutchman missed all four shots! Rolling Eyes The French followed by moving the Bonne Chance out of the St. Joan's way and simultaneously using her captain to take out two more masts on the Dutchman. The Dutchman's ineffective guns proved to be the turning point in this game. In the meantime, the Black Heart docked home her gold as the Marianne, Fureur, and St. Joan all headed for the French HI.



With the Dutchman in need of help, the Black Heart headed west. The Dutchman, with only two masts remaining, turned to desperate measures and ignored the dangerous Bonne Chance, heading north and finally succeeding at a shoot action by dismasting the Marianne. The French triumphantly dominated on their turn, with the Bonne Chance sinking the Dutchman with the help of her built-in reroll, and the Fureur and St. Joan docking home 5 coins.



With the St. Joan and Fureur docked, the Black Heart surprised the French by suddenly reversing course and heading north towards the island that the Fureur had explored. The Fureur and St. Joan headed west to tow the Marianne and grab the gold from the island that the Marianne couldn't get on her first trip. The Bonne Chance shadowed the Black Heart, wary of her size and identical built-in reroll ability.



Once again, the Black Heart changed direction. She went after the St. Joan and Fureur, but the Bonne Chance was too quick for her. The Bonne Chance caught up to her and shot and rammed away all four of her masts, ending the game!



The gold was tallied up, with the French receiving much higher values on average than the Pirates.
France: 21 gold
Pirates: 8 gold

Although a bit lopsided, this was an interesting game that marked a return to the old-school 30 point format. Hope you enjoyed it!
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 12:00 am Reply with quote

I've played another game using CC Mike's setup tables. For this game (as well as any future ones using the tables), I decided to re-roll any dice that had the same results as before, although no rerolls were necessary today.

I rolled a 4 (free ships totalling 10 masts), a 2 (roll on limits table), and another 2 (no named crew allowed). With no point limit, this would be the perfect game to try out some of those small expensive ships that normally wouldn't see use.

Fleet #1:
Naegling + captain, helmsman
Fenrir + helmsman
Hlidskjalf
Desert Wind + captain
Tripoli
Nimcha



Fleet #2:
USS Stephens + helmsman
Pale Moon + captain, helmsman
Sea Serpent + explorer
Lynx



In addition, 3 random UT's were placed into the treasure distribution.

Turn 1 consisted of all ships spreading out to the islands. Five ships headed for the northeast island, spelling trouble.



On the second turn, the Sea Serpent explored the northeast island and took 2 coins. The Pale Moon was able to move, shoot, and dock all in one turn, taking out two masts on the Naegling and grabbing another coin from the island. The Tripoli docked at the island as well but had no explorer and so had to wait. The Desert Wind landed a hit on the Sea Serpent, while the Naegling shot away both of the Pale Moon's masts with her remaining mast using the Longship keyword. The Naegling also boarded the Moon and stole the lone coin she had loaded. In the meantime, the HJ (this is the abbreviation I'm using for the Hlidskjalf) and the Nimcha docked at an island in the northwest.



The Lynx was headed home with three coins. The Pale Moon nabbed the last coin from the northeast island before the Tripoli could explore. Because the Desert Wind can't be shot at within S, the Sea Serpent had to simply sail for home, unable to use her reverse captain ability that would have been perfect for that situation.

On the BV's (Barbary Vikings) turn, the Desert Wind shot away the last mast on the Sea Serpent and stole one of her two coins. The Tripoli captured the Pale Moon as the Naegling turned home to repair and dock home the coin she stole from the Moon. The Nimcha and HJ explored their island, only to find three 1's and the often useless Trees UT. The Fenrir, who had previously been playing cat-and-mouse with the Stephens, moved to within striking distance (L+S) of the American HI.



The Lynx brought home her 3 coins. The mighty USS Stephens finally caught up with the Fenrir and maneuvered to get 4 guns in range. True to form, all four of them missed! This left the door wide open for the BV's, who capitalized on their opportunity. The Desert Wind rammed and dismasted the Lynx. The Fenrir sailed in and stole two of the three coins that the Lynx had just brought home. Finally, the Tripoli ditched the Pale Moon to block the Stephens. The Nimcha and Naegling both docked, bringing home 2 coins for the BV's.



The Lynx repaired her mast, while the Stephens somewhat redeemed herself by going 3 for 5 to sink the Fenrir. The Tripoli captured the Sea Serpent. The HJ docked home 2 more coins for the BV's while the Naegling spent the turn repairing.



The Americans pulled a fast one by using the Lynx's lone cannon (4L) to sink the captured Sea Serpent! Since the Tripoli couldn't be shot at and there were no other ships in range, the Stephens simply turned around.

The galleys ganged up on the Stephens. The Tripoli landed an improbable hit with her 4S cannon, which was followed by the Desert Wind moving in to ram the Stephens. This chaos resulted in another lost mast and the death of the helmsman on the Stephens. To make matters worse for the Americans, the Nimcha sailed up and rammed the Stephens, further limiting her movement.



On the seventh turn, the Lynx ran for the only untouched island, while the Stephens dismasted the Nimcha. It was too late for the Stephens, however, as the Desert Wind and Tripoli teamed up to dismast her, upon which she was captured by the Nimcha.



The Lynx grabbed the last coin from the island she had explored earlier in the game, but the Naegling caught up with her and easily shot away her single mast, ending the game!

The BV's benefited from their boarding and HI-raiding tactics, overcoming the rather low-value coins that they found.
Barbary Vikings: 12 gold
Americans: 9 gold

In addition, there was still 5 gold left on the Desert Wind and Pale Moon, and the Lynx had 1 gold on her when the game ended.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 5:07 am Reply with quote

One last game was played using the random setup tables.

Here were the rolls:
5: Roll on Special Set-up 1 table; no Limits
3: 4 free ships, each with a different hull design or number of masts; roll on Special Crew
4: 12 points for crew & events

This setup once again lent itself well to using rather expensive ships, so not surprisingly only one ship was under 12 points. The fleets unintentionally came out quite random, but the focus was on using game pieces that haven't been used much yet (if at all) and may not see much usage again, while still remaining competitive.

Fleet #1:
Calim
Pequod + helmsman, explorer
HMS Cheshire
Bashaw Folly + Osvaldo de Deus Celemente
Divers

Fleet #2:
United States + captain, helmsman
L'Ange de la Mer + captain, helmsman
Sea Wind + explorer
Scorpion + explorer

Just like the last game, three random UT's were included in the usual distribution of 4 coins for 4 wild islands. The islands were once again about L+S apart, with the home islands being close to each other.

Since there was no pattern in terms of nationality for either fleet, I will separate their half of each turn with paragraph breaks.

On the first turn, both the Sea Wind and the Scorpion grabbed gold to the north and east. The Sea Wind found Knights of Malta Banner, which is all but useless to non-Corsairs. The Scorpion found Runes of Defense, but decided against loading it because it would leave space for only one gold coin. The United States and L'Ange de la Mer (abbreviated with LAM) hovered around the Sea Wind.

Calim immediately went into an enraged frenzy! She stayed above the surface and rammed and boarded the United States. The ram was unsuccessful, but the boarding party took out a mast and the American helmsman. The Cheshire explored the southwestern island, taking two coins and Runes of Loki.





On the second turn, the United States opened fire! Since she was pinned and had her remaining four cannons in range, the Americans decided to go with a Broadsides Attack! With a dramatic flourish a 6 was rolled Shocked , blasting Calim backwards and sending her to the depths! The rest of Calim's fleet frantically looked in the Code for the ruling on Broadsides Attack in terms of using Runes of Loki as a counter. Cool Finding nothing, their excitement mounted until seeing the entry for Runes of Loki in the back of the Code:

The Pirate Code wrote:

Runes of Loki
Runes of Thor

-These abilities may be applied to any die roll that is made during the game regardless of which player rolled it or why, with the exception of a shoot action using the Broadside Attack keyword.


With that, the matter was settled, and Calim officially sunk beneath the waves. Making the situation even worse for the rest of Calim's fleet, the LAM maneuvered to take two masts out on the Pequod. The Sea Wind docked home her coins.

(this one reminds me of the end of the second Pirates of the Caribbean movie, when the Black Pearl initially shoots back the Kraken)


The Bashaw Folly became desperate after the death of Calim. With Celemente aboard, the Mercs were happy to give the Americans some of their own medicine. The Folly rammed the United States and succeeded with her own Broadsides Attack, leaving the United States with just one mast! The ram would've dismasted her, but it was a 1. However, the Folly also won the boarding party to kill the US captain, leaving the former five master with no crew.



On the third turn, the Scorpion docked home her gold. The LAM scored 3 hits on 4 tries against the Cheshire, but the Cheshire saved herself by using Runes of Loki to negate one of the hits, leaving her with one mast. The United States, now with S speed and unable to move-and-shoot, rolled once more for a Broadsides Attack to try to dismast the Folly. Luck was not with the Americans this time, however, as they rolled a 1. However, the Sea Wind had docked on the previous turn in such a way that two of her three guns were in range of the pinned Bashaw Folly. Since the United States was within S of the Sea Wind, she would get +1 to her cannon rolls. This meant she needed fours to hit, still an improbable task considering the lack of luck with the dice. However, she rolled two 4's and dismasted the Folly! Shocked

In the meantime, the Cheshire docked home her 2 coins, while the Pequod rammed away the final mast on the United States.

The fourth turn saw the LAM sink the Bashaw Folly. The Pequod rammed the LAM but lost both rolls. The Cheshire repaired a mast.



On the next turn, both the Scorpion and Sea Wind went back to wild islands, while the LAM sank the Pequod.

At this point, the Cheshire had to concede defeat, while stalling tactics would only result in the other fleet gathering more gold. She sailed out to take on the LAM, who promptly sunk her to end the game!

Fleet #2: 17 gold
Fleet #1: 8 gold

This was the last game for now, but I'll be able to play again in about 3 weeks. That's when things will really rev up. Twisted Evil
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Subject:    PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 9:56 pm Reply with quote

I'm ready to play again! Very Happy

After the Garante fleet won a game against the Pirates earlier this year, I wanted to see if I could better utilize her with the Native Canoes to enhance her ability.

I also used woelf's house rules for treasure, using 16 random treasures for the four islands and including 3 completely random UT's as well.

Spanish:
El Garante + tribal chieftain, captain, helmsman
La Anunciada + captain, fire shot
La Monarca + explorer
El Hambre
Native Canoes



Americans:
Roanoke + Captain Blackheart, helmsman, explorer, oarsman
USS Sioux + captain, helmsman
USS James Madison + explorer
Lynx
Hidden Cove, Divers, Raft





The Spanish were the first player. With the islands only 2L apart and the home islands close together it would be interesting to see how the Garante and her canoes went about their maneuvering. The Hambre was able to get to the nearest island while all of the other Spanish ships formed a cluster with the Monarca and Anunciada on the port side of the Garante.





The Americans saw the Spanish and considered moving north and northeast to avoid conflict and escort their treasure runners (the Lynx and James Madison) to wild islands. The Lynx and James Madison headed northeast, but the Roanoke and Sioux decided to take a chance and make a run at the Spanish while they were bunched up and vulnerable.

Hidden Cove was flipped, docking the Sioux at the northern side of the middle wild island where the canoes had started the game. She sailed northwest to block all three Spanish ships and fired a powerful broadside, dismasting the Monarca and taking out a mast on the Anunciada! Hidden Cove had been used once again to give a fleet a decided advantage.

The Roanoke sailed north and sank one of the native canoes, missing with her other guns. Then Blackheart sacced the American oarsman and raked the Garante by the stern, shooting away two more masts. After the impressive Spanish fleet had set sail, the game was almost over before it had even started!



Although the Spanish were in bad shape and surrounded by the two American gunships, they fought back admirably on the next turn. The Anunciada set the Sioux on fire with her equipment. Then the native canoes took a shoot action, hitting once in three tries to reduce the Sioux to one mast. Finally the Garante moved and used the nearby canoes to hit the Sioux twice more to sink her! In the meantime the Hambre explored her wild island, finding a 7 and a 2 and no UT's.



The Roanoke moved quickly to retaliate. Her first action sunk the Hambre, upon which the Americans used Divers to recover all of the sunken gold, giving them 9 gold on their HI. The Roanoke sacced her explorer to move and shoot a second time, dismasting the Anunciada and taking out two more masts on the Garante, leaving the Spanish with one mast on the Garante and four native canoes. The Lynx and James Madison were at islands getting gold.



At this point it was far too late for the Spanish. The Garante managed to take a mast off the James Madison and moved the Lynx and her island via Bad Maps, but the Americans ended the game soon thereafter with the Roanoke.





In the end the final score was technically 9-0 in favour of the Americans, however there was actually another 18 gold on the James Madison and Lynx coming home. The combination of Hidden Cove, Captain Blackheart, and some well-timed Divers made for a quick blowout American victory.

PS: If the pictures are too large for the screen and make it harder to read the text, I realized recently that it's easiest to simply zoom out a little bit (ctrl + scroll down for me) in order to read it more easily.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 6:40 pm Reply with quote

I've started to test out a multitude of fleets that I've wanted to play for a while now. First up: Universal Pirate Shipping (by darrin) vs. the Dead Man's Chest UT Fleet (lordstu). (Note: if you aren't familiar with these fleets it would be very helpful to read up on them, or else the battle report probably won't make a lot of sense.)

Universal Pirate Shipping

The Lache de Calvados is proxying in for the Intrepide, while the Zephyr plays the Jolly Mon.


Dead Man's Chest UT Fleet



Because this was a more "serious" game (just as the others between such competitive fleets will be), the islands were placed at their usual distance of 3L apart rather than 2L or 1L. No terrain was used. Since Captain Jack Sparrow can't trade away the UT's in the original UPS fleet they weren't used. In this way the fleet utilized 7 2's and a 1 so they'd be able to build Paradis de la Mer on the first turn no matter what. The DMC (Dead Man's Chest) fleet only used the actual UT Dead Man's Chest since that was the entire object of the gimmick.

For the first game the UPS fleet rolled to go first. The Hai Peng immediately jumped to the first island in the middle and was able to build Paradis de la Mer with the Longshanks and Jolly Mon following.

The DMC fleet Hidden Cove'd the Banshee's Cry to the northeastern island and she redocked in order to explore, improbably finding the Dead Man's Chest! The nature of the game (with the original "more than half the starting gold" aka 16 gold) lent itself to a quick ending. The Cry essentially contained an instant win if the UPS fleet couldn't hit her or eliminate some crew. However, this is where another event, Becalmed, came into play. It was placed midway between the Hai Peng and the Longshanks, partially freezing both ships and the Jolly Mon. I say partially because all three ships had oarsmen and were able to move a little bit on the following turn. They couldn't move enough to be able to catch the speedy Cry, leaving her to race home and give the DMC fleet a quick victory! The Cry also had 2 gold on her from the island so the final score was:

DMC fleet: 18 gold
UPS fleet: 0 gold





I was stunned that a fleet as slow and gimmicky as the DMC fleet could beat UPS so handily. However, Hidden Cove and Becalmed gave them a huge advantage, and the Cry was lucky to find the DMC UT at the first island she went to.

For the second game the home islands were reversed. UPS went first again, with the Hai Peng springing out to build Paradis de la Mer on the middle island. UPS tried to position their ships farther apart than in the last game but Becalmed still managed to reach the Hai Peng and Longshanks.

The Banshee's Cry didn't find the DMC on the first island she went to. However, the abilities of the Morocco and Raven's Neck revealed it to be on the southwestern island.



Because of Becalmed the UPS fleet couldn't build another fort on the second turn, but the Hai Peng saw the Banshee's Cry and decided to go after her because she's so vulnerable.



The Hai Peng used her extreme speed to catch up to the Cry and knock down her lone mast. At this point the game was looking dismal for the DMC fleet, but the Cry had an oarsman which she used to crawl towards the island with the DMC on it.



Despite their slow speeds the Morocco and Raven's Neck started to reach the action, turning two all-gold fleets into a couple of fighting fleets! The Morocco rammed the Hai Peng but it backfired when she lost the boarding action and therefore one of her six oarsmen.



On the next turn the Longshanks took out a mast and oarsman on the Raven's Neck, but the Hai Peng really sealed the game for the UPS fleet. She blocked the Cry, explored the island, took the DMC and built Dead Man's Point (via Sparrow/Aristide) all in one turn! Shocked



At this point the game was safely in the hands of the UPS fleet so the DMC fleet forfeited the game to save some time for one final game to decide the winner of the three game series.

The third and final game was the shortest of them all. The DMC fleet went first for the first time and was therefore able to use Becalmed to freeze the Hai Peng for the UPS's first turn. The Cry was Hidden Cove'd to an island where she found the DMC. With a turn already lost it was too late for the UPS fleet. The Hai Peng almost managed to catch the Cry since she moves so fast, but she came up just short, allowing the Cry to dock the DMC home for another instant win!

The Cry brings home the DMC just in front of the UPS fleet (unintentionally in line of battle lol).


For this series the DMC fleet beat the UPS fleet two out of three times. This really surprised me, although the original UPS fleet probably isn't the most effective one. I'll be testing the others very soon. The two events really help out quite a lot, part of the reason I made that thread recently. I'll likely use these fleets in some other games soon, especially once more of the 40 point fleets are out.
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Subject:    PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 11:34 pm Reply with quote

For the next three game series, there would be a deathmatch series between two 40 point fleets.

The two fleets were my second HMS Grand Temple fleet (HMS Grand Temple v 2.0) and my fleet with USS Kettering (USS Kettering - Deadly Weapon).

HMS Grand Temple v 2.0



USS Kettering - Deadly Weapon

The Death's Anchor is proxying in for the Minuteman while the Diablo is a proxy for the Armada.


Two islands were placed 6L apart and the games got under way. The GT (Grand Temple) fleet didn't use Divers or the UT's since it was a deathmatch. The GT fleet went first for the first two games and the Kettering went first in the last game, not that it really mattered. Both fleets simply tried to maneuver to get the first shot. With three cancellers, two flotillas and the Grand Temple things were bound to get heated quickly!

Game 1:
The GT got the SAT from Crimson Angel and moved just out of range of the cancelling Kettering Cool . She had 5 guns in range and hit every time, dismasting the Kettering and Algeciras. The Armada retaliated but only hit once in four tries, although this eliminated CRGO (Commodore Rhys Gryffyn Owen). The Minuteman also went 1 for 4 to take a second mast off the GT. The Grand Temple then sank both the Algeciras and Kettering. The Minuteman sank the Rye and the Armada hit the GT twice, eliminating both H. Gold and Lawrence. The GT eliminated the flag on Armada but only had two guns left so she couldn't sink her, allowing Armada to dismast the Temple and win the game for the Spanish Americans!

Game 2:
For the second game the GT again waited to get an SAT from Angel in order to strike first, taking out both flotillas in a 6 for 6 shoot action. After the first game the GT didn't want to face the flotillas late in the game.

Luis Zuan was cancelled aboard the Algeciras but she moved to ram and dismast the Rye, who was still able to move with her oar power. The Kettering, originally with her stern to the GT, managed to get two of her three guns in range and hit all 4 times, once again leaving the GT with only two masts. However, this was just enough for the GT to shoot and ram the Kettering to dismast her. The Algeciras sunk the Rye but the GT then dismasted the Algeciras, giving the English a victory to even the series at one apiece.

Game 3:
For the third game the Spanish Americans decided to be more aggressive and try to at least get a shot in before the GT got the SAT. The Algeciras maneuvered the Armada to get her S+S range guns just into range, hitting 1 out of 3 times and eliminating CRGO (cargo just like the ability says Laughing ). The Minuteman and Algeciras also got a few hits in to leave the GT with three masts. The Kettering missed the GT twice before the GT could retaliate, dismasting the Kettering. However, the flotillas showed their power once again by combining to sink the GT.

For this series, the USS Kettering fleet defeated the HMS GT v 2.0 fleet 2 games to 1.
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a7xfanben
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Subject:    PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 4:25 am Reply with quote

The next three game series will pit UPS v. 2.0 against the Extra Action Gold Runners fleet. I was only able to play the first game of the series just now. Again, if you haven't checked out those fleets yet I suggest you do so. The links are below.

UPS v. 2.0

The Lache de Calvados is a proxy for the Intrepide and the Rover is being used instead of Favor of the Gods.


Extra Action Gold Runners

The Swift is a proxy for the Star of Siam.


Turn 1:
UPS (v. 2.0) went first. The Hai Peng was Hidden Cove'd to the middle wild island and found Screu Engine which was left behind. A 2 coin was traded via CJS/Intrepide/Aristide (you know the deal by now) and the Pirates were in business with 4 gold. At the next island the Hai Peng found both Turtles and Homing Beacon, making the EA Runners fleet look bad by finding their UT's before they even left home! Paradis de la Mer was built on this second island. The Rover sailed towards the middle island.

For the EA Runners fleet, all three (counting Vaccaro's reroll) of the EA rolls failed and therefore the Star of Siam and Joya del Sol were unable to reach islands.



Turn 2:
Turn 2 was incredibly predictable. Thanks to darrin's comprehensive fleet description I was able to follow his instructions to a tee:

darrin wrote:
Second Turn
1. Move the Hai Peng away and then re-dock at the same island with your first fort. Send another coin to L'Intrepide.
2. As a free action, swap Maurice Aristide back onto L'Intrepide and put another oarsman on Le Coeur de Lion.
3. Use an explore action to unload L'Intrepide's coin for +2 gold.
4. Sacrifice an oarsman to Jimmy Legs, load the traded oarsman as a free action, and move back to the first island you explored. Send another coin to Le Coeur de Lion.
5. As a free action, move Maurice Aristide to Le Coeur de Lion.
6. Use an explore action to unload Le Coeur de Lion's coin for +2 gold.
7. Build a second fort at the island where Hai Peng is docked.


Dead Man's Point was built on the middle wild island.

The EA Runners were luckier than on their first turn with the Joya getting an extra action from Castro without having to reroll. The Joya explored the northeastern island and found 10 gold (the UT's required the EA fleet to put a 7, a 6 and a 2 into the treasure mix), then turned around and made it halfway home.



Turn 3:
Because the gold in forts doesn't technically count towards victory anymore the UPS fleet would have to make do. The Hai Peng traded another 2 (4 after Aristide) to her HI, leaving the Pirates with 12 gold total on their HI. The Hai Peng then went back to Paradis and loaded both 2's for 4 gold total. At this point there were no more oarsmen left on the HI for which to trade to the Hai Peng. The Rover had meanwhile picked up a 2 from Dead Man's Point and was sailing home with it.

For the EA fleet, all 3 rolls failed once again. The Joya del Sol docked home 10 gold to narrow the score to 12-10 in favor of UPS. In the meantime the Algeciras had approached the Rover and managed to get her 3L gun in range, but she missed (this was the only shot fired in the game).



Turn 4:
The Hai Peng simply raced home and sacced Cotton (the helmsman) to make it the whole way. She unloaded her cargo of 4 gold to give UPS the 16-10 victory!

Observations: This UPS fleet is obscenely complicated and involved, not to mention FAST. I'd like to congratulate darrin for making such a well-thought-out fleet. It really is interesting to play. I had to look at the fleet description to know what I was supposed to do with all the crew and treasure transfers! What really struck me was how long the turn takes. With the Hai Peng doing so much and getting the two ships at the HI involved, the UPS turns took FAR longer than any normal turn for other fleets, including the EA fleet.

It's funky to do so much with crew. I started to get confused as to how many crew and points I was supposed to fit on the Hai Peng and which oarsmen were supposed to be on the Intrepide vs. the Coeur. Then the crew ran out! Jimmy Legs and Aristide just make things even more interesting. The explorer is a good candidate to be sacced because after the first turn you really don't need him since you've already explored the two islands you need to hit.

The next two games in this series will be played tomorrow (12/23).
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Subject:    PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 8:01 pm Reply with quote

I've played the last two games of the series between UPS v. 2.0 and Extra Action Gold Runners.

Game 2:
The EA Runners fleet went first in both games. The Joya del Sol got the EA from Castro and was able to explore a nearby wild island, finding 6 gold and Turtles.

The Hai Peng was Hidden Cove'd to a wild island where she found Homing Beacon, Cross of Coronado, and Screu Engine along with just one 2-gold coin. After trading this to the Intrepide she sacced to the next island and found the 7, sending it home and using the +2'd first coin to build Paradis de la Mer (I feel like this fleet makes a verb out of everything). This left 9 total gold on UPS's HI (7 + 2).



On the second turn the EA fleet failed to get any extra actions and was relegated to sailing to and from islands at S+S+S, quite slow in a game like this haha.

Since the Hai Peng knew there was no point in going back to the first island with only UT's, she redocked twice at Paradis on the second turn, sending home 4 gold total. This was upped to 8 via Aristide and it gave the Pirates a 17-0 victory!





At the end of the first turn the Hai Peng had loaded Homing Beacon, which UPS considered using because the first island was mostly a dud and they couldn't send coins home from it. The Hai Peng would load two coins from the second island (Paradis), teleport home via the Beacon, then sac an oarsman to catapult to a new island that the Star of Siam had just docked at but not explored. However, it was easier to just use Captain Jack Sparrow and send home two coins from Paradis, upon which Aristide doubled their values and gave UPS enough gold to win. Also, although it was a shutout for UPS, the EA fleet had 6 gold on the Joya and all 10 Turtles approaching their HI.

Game 3:
The Joya del Sol got an EA from Castro on the first turn and found 17 gold on one island! She found the 7 and 6 that her fleet had contributed as well as two 2's.

The Hai Peng traded back 2 gold as normal, but due to the island setup she wasn't able to reach a second island. Their HI was the middle island and the Joya's island and the EA fleet's HI were the only islands she could have gotten to.

The island setup proved irrelevant on the second turn when the Joya got another EA and docked home her 17 gold to win the game for the EA Runners!



This third game was the fastest of the three and proved that even UPS v. 2.0 can be beat by a ship using extra actions that happened to get very lucky with the gold. It also made me think of the "more than half the starting gold" rule for two player games, which really does make things a bit boring and predictable. These games are meant to use the official rules (which actually help these particular fleets, especially UPS), but it would be interesting to see what would happen if the treasure was more random and it was kept face down on home islands.

Conclusion: UPS v. 2.0 beats EA Gold Runners 2 games to 1. The third game was a bit of a fluke because the Joya found 17 gold on one island and the UPS HI was in a bad spot. I would say that this version of UPS is better than the original fleet because of Jimmy Legs. The Longshanks didn't really do a lot anyway and this Hai Peng is so fast and active it's kind of scary.
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